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2Do's | RECIPES

HOW I MAKE MY MATCHA

Sky Haarsma

hello world!
@skyhaarsma

Ingredients:

ceremonial grade matcha
oat milk
hot water
(plus optional sweeteners n add-ins that I mention)

....and all the tools that I linked at the bottom <3

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I was just in the kitchen whipping up my daily matcha and as I drooled over the first sip, I realized OMG I have to tell TIGG how amazing this is. I can’t believe I have been holding out on you guys and hiding my creamy goodness!

Matcha Addicts

I am a proud matcha addict, as are many other it girls.

Devon Lee Carlson and Bella Hadid revealed they have a matcha every morning. Same girlfriends.

But I have rules with my matcha.

First of all,

  • always oat milk.
  • never sweetened.
  • most likely iced.

But if I need some warm fuzziness, I’ll get a hot and foamy one. 

@devonleecarlson

Who Loves Matchas?

Victoria’s Secret models Romee Strijd and Sanne Vloet are always making matchas and after watching every single one of their Youtube videos, I’ve learned a thing or two. Plus, I went through a phase where I was obsessed with learning how people made their matcha. Whether it was the super traditional way with no milk or a crazy creamy extra milky sweet matcha, once you learn the rules, you can learn to break them.

Which is exactly what I did. 

Breaking the Rules of Matcha Making

For example, you aren’t supposed to drink matcha with milk because the milk sticks to the polyphenols, and then your body can’t absorb the nutrients.

And for those who don’t know, matcha has like a million health benefits.

Plus, your skin will love it.

Matcha has a bunch of anti-inflammatory properties, and it can reduce redness of the skin (sign me up). But don’t worry, I’m not going to get all "sciencey" on you, just google some benefits if you want the dirty secrets.

Now, there are usually two ways I actually make my matcha (as in how I prepare it, the ingredients are always the same for me). I have the thorough and more traditional way, which takes more time, but it feels like a meditation.

It’s a great little ritual.

But sometimes I’m in a bit of a rush, or I just want my matcha right away, and I have a quick tool to get that job done in no time. So depending on your vibe, just pick which method feels right at the moment. Yesterday I took my time, but today I just wanted a quick pick me up. 

I’m going to tell you guys exactly how I make my matcha, but I’m also going to give some suggestions on how you can tweak your drink to be just right for you. Because making a matcha latte is just like making a regular latte, some people like it sweet, some people like it plain, some people like a cold foam, some people like it thin, yadadada.

You get the idea. 

Making a Matcha - The Ingredients

Okay, so first up: the ingredients. You want a really, really good quality matcha powder because that makes all the difference.

Trust me.

It may be a bit pricey, but you have to do it. There is ceremonial grade matcha and culinary matcha.

You need a ceremonial grade matcha.

What Does the Difference in Matcha Color Mean?

A big way you can tell the difference between the two is in the color. Really good quality matcha (ceremonial grade) will be a vibrant and bright green. Culinary grade matcha, which you should use when you want to make matcha cookies or something, will be a darker, more dirt green color.

As long as the matcha you are getting is ceremonial grade matcha and vibrant green, it will likely work for you.

I switch up the matcha powder that I use all the time. Right now, I’m using the matcha powder from Cha Cha Matcha since I love that cafe and wanted to make it at home. The matcha is actually really good and tastes just like theirs.

I would recommend it.

I’ll link some other matchas for you as well at the bottom. In fact, Sanne has her own matcha brand, and it’s actually super amazing.

Now, I like my matcha with oat milk. It makes the drink super thick and creamy, and the flavors complement each other really well. I use the Chobani plain oat milk, but I switch it up every once in a while. However, I have really been loving that one recently. But you can use whatever milk you like. Just use the milk you make your coffee with or just your favorite brand.

If you like almond milk, use almond; if you like a different kind of oat milk, use that kind.

Also, feel free to do a half-and-half situation. I went through a period where I would do ½ almond and ½ oat. 

Finding Your Favorite Matcha Combo

Some additional add in’s that I personally don’t use in my Matcha, but you might like are:

  • cinnamon
  • vanilla extract
  • maple syrup
  • vanilla syrup
  • espresso
  • coffee creamer
  • honey, and more.

You can mix and match until you find your favorite combo. I don’t like adding any sweetener to my matcha just because I love the taste of it unsweetened, and the oat milk adds enough sweetness for me. But that is just a personal preference, and I have always been like that. In fact, I think sweetened matcha tastes bad, but some may argue actual matcha tastes bad.

So YOU DO YOU.

If it's your first time making matcha, I would suggest making a plain one with milk and then a sweetened one with milk and either maple syrup or something that you would use to sweeten a coffee, like that vanilla syrup if you have it.

First up, I’m giving you the rundown on how I make my matcha when I’m wanting that meditation it gives, or I have some extra time.

Remember, this isn’t a super in-depth idea, and it’s just what I do; I’m not a professional.

Like I read that you are supposed to wet the whisk first, but I don’t do that, so whatever, get over it.

And I have tried measuring things out like one cup of this, one teaspoon of this, blah blah blah; honestly, when it comes to matcha, I think you should just measure with your heart

Legit Matcha Supplies

So for my extravagant matcha routine, you def need some legit supplies. I use:

  • a bamboo matcha whisk (essential)
  • a matcha bowl for whisking (kinda essential)
  • a specific scooper thing (not that essential)
  • a small sifter (kinda essential)
  • matcha powder (essential duh)
  • hot water (essential)
  • and oat milk (you already know).

I scoop about a teaspoon of matcha into the sifter above the bowl and sift it in, ensuring there are no lumps. Then I add a small amount of hot water, just enough to be able to whisk and dissolve the matcha. Then I take my matcha whisk and whisk it all together until it is super frothy and has a bunch of small bubbles.

When whisking, you want to make sure you are incorporating air into it, so you get those bubbles. Then I take a mason jar with ice and add oat milk.

Then I pour my matcha over my milk and stir with a bamboo straw.

Boom.

No metal was used whatsoever because someone said metal is bad for matcha, and I’d rather be safe than sorry.

I like my matcha to milk ratio to look like an iced latte. I make my matcha as strong as espresso and then use a cup of milk. But you could also add more hot water to your matcha bowl and then just a splash of milk at the end, more like an iced coffee with a splash of milk. You could also froth your milk if you’d like, or keep it hot and not add ice (plus heat up the milk).

Now, if you are like, "that sounded like a lot of dishes," I feel you.

Making a Super Quick Matcha

So here is how I whip up super quick matcha that tastes just as good. All you need besides the matcha powder, milk, and water, is an electric matcha whisk. I use the same one Devon Lee Carlson uses, and I have linked it at the bottom. It looks like the electric whisk everyone uses for their coffee, but this one is bamboo and works like a charm with matcha.

To make this recipe, all I do is add about ¼ cup of hot water to a tall glass as well as about a teaspoon of matcha. Then I use the electric whisk to whisk it all up and boom, done.

Now you can repeat the other steps regarding the whole milk and ice situation. So both drinks look the same and usually taste the same, but one is just more of a meditation which I have come to learn to love.

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